Tag Archives: Kristan Cole

Vanity Fair Discovers Sarah Palin is Loud and Secretive

Excellent detailed piece on Sarah Palin by journalist Michael Joseph Gross in the October 2010 issue of Vanity Fair

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Sarah Palin: The Sound and the Fury

Former Republican Vice Presidential Candidate Sarah Palin speaks at the "Restoring Honor" rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on August 28, 2010.

Even as Sarah Palin’s public voice grows louder, she has become increasingly secretive, walling herself off from old friends and associates, and attempting to enforce silence from those around her. Following the former Alaska governor’s road show, the author delves into the surreal new world Palin now inhabits—a place of fear, anger, and illusion, which has swallowed up the engaging, small-town hockey mom and her family—and the sadness she has left in her wake.

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Investigator Rules Against Palin in Ethics Probe

There is probable cause to believe Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin used or attempted to use her official position for personal gain in authorizing the creation of her legal defense trust.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An independent investigator has found evidence that Gov. Sarah Palin may have violated ethics laws by trading on her position as she sought money for lawyer fees, in the latest legal distraction for the former vice presidential candidate as she prepares to leave office this week.

The report obtained by The Associated Press says Palin is securing unwarranted benefits and receiving improper gifts through the Alaska Fund Trust, set up by supporters.

An investigator for the state Personnel Board says in his July 14 report that there is probable cause to believe Palin used or attempted to use her official position for personal gain because she authorized the creation of the trust as her legal defense fund.

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Preliminary Report Questions Palin Legal Defense Fund

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin

Legal questions continue to follow Alaska Governor Sarah Palin in her final days of office.

A preliminary report raises the possibility that Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska, who has been dogged by ethics complaints, many of them dismissed as frivolous, may not be allowed to pay her legal bills with money from her legal defense fund.

Ms. Palin has amassed legal bills of more than $500,000 and has said that those debts are part of the reason she is resigning her office. She steps down on Sunday, a year and a half before the end of her term.

The preliminary report, written by Thomas M. Daniel, an investigator for the state personnel board, came in response to an ethics complaint filed shortly after the fund was established a few months ago. The complaint questioned whether it was proper for the governor to have a defense fund in the first place.

The report, written July 14 and first reported Tuesday by The Associated Press, said that the governor had an unfair fund-raising advantage over ordinary citizens because she was a public official, that her fund was trading on her status as a public official to solicit donations and that contributions to the fund could amount to improper gifts under Alaska law. It recommended that Ms. Palin refuse to accept payment from the fund.

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Palin Appointed Friends and Donors to Key Posts in Alaska, Records Show

In today’s Los Angeles Times it was reported that 100-plus jobs went to Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s campaign donors or their relatives, sometimes without apparent regard to qualifications. Several donors got state-subsidized loans for business ventures of dubious public value.

Reporting from Anchorage — Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, plucked from relative obscurity in part for her reform credentials, has been eager to tout them in her vice presidential campaign.

“I took on the old politics as usual in Juneau when I stood up to the special interests and the lobbyists and the big oil companies and the good old boys,” Palin told the Republican National Convention in her acceptance speech. She said that as a new governor she “shook things up, and in short order we put the government of our state back on the side of the people.”

By midway through her first term, she had signed an ethics reform bill, increased oil profit taxes and tweaked Big Oil again by awarding a gas pipeline contract to a Canadian company.

In some other respects, a Los Angeles Times examination of state records shows, her approach to government was business as usual. Take, for example, the tradition of patronage. Some of Palin’s most controversial appointments involved donors, records show.

Among The Times’ findings:

* More than 100 appointments to state posts — nearly 1 in 4 — went to campaign contributors or their relatives, sometimes without apparent regard to qualifications.

* Palin filled 16 state offices with appointees from families that donated $2,000 to $5,600 and were among her top political patrons.

* Several of Palin’s leading campaign donors received state-subsidized industrial development loans of up to $3.6 million for business ventures of questionable public value.

* Palin picked a donor to replace the public safety commissioner she fired. But the new top cop had to resign days later under an ethics cloud. And Palin drew a formal ethics complaint still pending against her and several aides for allegedly helping another donor and fundraiser land a state job.

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