Tag Archives: Hillary Clinton

Sarah Palin: Going Rogue, Going Book Tourin’, Going Into Obscurity

Sarah Palin: Heading into Obscurity Anytime Soon? We can only hope.

The most exciting event of our time is coming and I can hardly wait. The day everyone has been waiting for will be here on Nov. 17. Going Rogue, Sarah Palin’s great American novel will finally arrive! Bring out the champagne. Let’s all have a book party. This is THE event of the century.

Even before the first copy is released, Going Rogue is outselling other women of equal intellect and accomplishments. A Woman in Charge: The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton is down in the numbers . Palin is way ahead of The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice, by Sandra Dey O’Connor. Not even that amazingly accomplished Paris Hilton: Life on the Edge, can match Palin’s literary success.

Here she is, folks. The Lady of the Year, the Maverick to end all Maverick’s, the new leader of the Republican Party in skirts. What a woman! What an amazing role model for all ambitious young women everywhere . Especially those who want to rise to fame and fortune based on their charm and their wit, and their ability to manipulate the conservative right like nothing ever before.

Let’s all hail the almighty Palin. Parodied by Tina Fey, ridiculed by those nasty men in the media, insulted by none other than David Letterman and not once did she ever lose sight of her number 1 goal:

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Hillary Clinton vs Sarah Palin? Not in Our Lifetime

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Our Capitolist friend Pat Murphy reports that Hillary Clinton has effectively posted a notice to PUMAs, and to the rest of us, she’s not running for president ever again. In effect saying she’s already a big girl in a big job and feels very comfortable with the way things have turned out (“maybe it’s a woman thing“), the past first lady and former U.S. senator told Ann Curry on NBC’s “Today Show” she will let the job of secretary of state be her career capstone.

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Thanks But No Thanks: GOP Candidates Ignore Palin Offers

Sarah Palin notably absent from gubernatorial races

Sarah Palin stands ready to stump for Republican gubernatorial candidates, but neither seems to want her help.

Sarah Palin stands ready to stump for Republican gubernatorial candidates, but neither Chris Christie nor Bob McDonnell seems to want her help.

Sarah Palin stands ready to stump for the Republican gubernatorial candidates running in the two most closely-watched campaigns in the country this fall, but neither seems to want her help.

Less than a month before voters go to the polls, it appears increasingly clear that the former Alaska governor, vice-presidential nominee and conservative favorite will not appear on behalf of either New Jersey’s Chris Christie or Virginia’s Bob McDonnell.

Palin is the only one of the most talked-about potential 2012 presidential candidates who has not yet campaigned for either Republican candidate.

Given her loyal following among many in the party’s grassroots, it’s Palin who could surely draw the largest crowd and perhaps raise the most money for the two candidates—her book, “Going Rogue,” is already the number-one bestseller on Amazon, over a month before it’s even released.

“The governor offered her assistance with both races,” said Palin adviser Meg Stapleton. “The ball is in their court.”

Neither GOP campaign wanted to discuss why they didn’t want Palin in the state—to say so would offend the conservative base that both Christie and McDonnell are counting on, not just to vote for them but to also volunteer time in the crucial final weeks of the election.

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Sarah Palin as Opera? You Betcha!

Republican Vice Presidential candidate Alaska Governor Sarah Palin and Democrat Vice Presidential candidate Senator Joe Biden  took part in the highly anticipated Vice Presidential debate October 2, 2008 at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Republican Vice Presidential candidate Alaska Governor Sarah Palin and Democrat Vice Presidential candidate Senator Joe Biden took part in the highly anticipated Vice Presidential debate October 2, 2008 at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. The debate was moderated by PBS anchor Gwen Ifill.

Sarah Palin isn’t vice president. And she probably won’t ever be president. Heck – she’s not even a governor anymore.

But the Alaskan pol has achieved one measure of fame – someone’s written an opera about her.

“Say It Ain’t So, Joe,” a presentation by Guerilla Opera, opens Saturday at Boston Conservatory’s Zack Box Theater. The work is composer Curtis Hughes’ musical take on America’s favorite moose-hunting winker, you betcha. It focuses on that contentious – and sometimes comical – debate from October 2008 between Palin and Joe Biden, though the show also includes cameos from Hillary Clinton, Gwen Ifill, Diane Sawyer and, of course, the right-wing’s favorite Everyman, Joe the Plumber.

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A Woman in the White House ~ 2012 or 2016?

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Asked about the prospect of a woman winning the presidency during an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton responded: “I’m not going to pretend that running for president as a woman is not daunting….and it is….probably a path that doesn’t appeal to a lot of women even in elective office because it is so difficult.”

Sarah Palin

Sarah Palin

Clinton’s comments — coupled with the resignation of former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) over the weekend — got us to thinking about the dearth of female politicians in the political world at the moment who are actively discussed as presidential mettle.

Clinton was widely regarded as the best hope women had to see one of their own elected to the White House; she was well-known, had a huge political machine at her disposal, pots of campaign cash to spend and was widely seen as up to the job by the American public.

“Meet” host David Gregory asked Clinton the “if not you, who” question to which Clinton responded: “I am convinced — and I don’t know if she is elective office right now or preparing to run for office — but there is a woman who I am hoping will be able to achieve that.”

But, who?

A quick glance at the roster of women currently serving in the Senate or as governor — the ranks from which presidential candidates typically emerge — turns up 17 senators and six governors.

Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison

Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison

Of that group, just one — Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R) — has ever been seriously mentioned as a national candidate. But, Hutchison seems set on returning to the Lone Star State full time with her 2010 primary challenge to Gov. Rick Perry (R). If she wins that race, Hutchison would theoretically be in position to run but she would be 69 years old on election day 2012 and putting together a national campaign would be hard to imagine.

Governor Jennifer Granholm

Governor Jennifer Granholm

Outgoing Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm was widely seen as a rising star with the Democratic party when she was elected in 2002 but the cratering Michigan economy has diminished her appeal significantly. Also, she’s Canadian — not that there’s anything wrong with that! — making her ineligible to be president.

That leaves 21 other women — none of whom are actively discussed as potential national candidates. The best possibility is Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) who could be appealing given her ability to win statewide in Missouri. But, McCaskill will almost face a serious re-election fight in 2012 (Jim Talent, anyone?) and has to get through that race before she can be seriously considered.

Senator Claire McCaskill

Senator Claire McCaskill

Down a level to the House, the pickings are also slim. (Historically running from the U.S. House is a death wish for presidents; the last — and only — sitting member of Congress to win the White House was James Garfield in 1880.)

The most obvious choice would be Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D-S.D.) who has a strong political pedigree (her grandfather was governor, her father was a longtime state legislator), the ability to win votes in a red state and is young enough at 38 to spend the time needed to build the sort of network she would need to run for national office. But, Herseth Sandlin declined an expected run for governor in 2010 — delaying an expected ascent into a more high-profile office. If Sen. Tim Johnson (D-S.D.) decides against seeking a fourth term in 2014, Herseth Sandlin would be the obvious choice.

Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D-S.D.)

Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin

Among the candidates currently running for statewide office in 2010, there are few obvious choices. Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) and former New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly Ayotte (R) are each young, highly regarded and running for the Senate; at the gubernatorial level, former eBay President Meg Whitman (R) and Florida CFO Alex Sink (D) might be possibilities if they can get elected.

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan

But, that is far down the road. The simple fact is that Clinton was by far the best positioned woman to win the nation’s highest office and there is no one like her in the political minor leagues at the moment.

Could Palin be that person? Perhaps, although her high unfavorable ratings with Independents and Democrats complicate any path for her to the White House even if she decided to run.

Former New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly Ayotte

Former New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly Ayotte

Are there up and coming women we missed? Feel free to offer their names in the comments section below.

Chris Cillizza
The Washington Post

Sarah Palin Grabs the Grievance Grab Bag From Hillary Clinton

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on NBC's "Meet the Press" this past Sunday.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on NBC's "Meet the Press" this past Sunday.

The woman who was prematurely counted in is out. And the woman who was prematurely counted out is in.

Goodbye, Sarah. Hello, Hillary.

In their vivid twin performances Sunday — Hillary on “Meet the Press” in Washington and Sarah at her farewell picnic in Fairbanks — two of the most celebrated and polarizing women in American political history offered a fascinating contrast.

Hillary, who so often in the past came across as aggrieved, paranoid and press-loathing, was confident and comfortable in her role as top diplomat, discussing the world with mastery and shrugging off suggestions that she has been disappeared by her former rival, the president.

Sarah Palin

Sarah Palin

Sarah, who was once a blazingly confident media darling, came across as aggrieved, paranoid and press-loathing in her new role as bizarre babe-at-large, a Nixon with hair extensions ranting about “American apologetics,” which sounds like a cross between apologists and Dianetics.

Sarah once criticized Hillary for being a whiny presidential contender, arguing that women who want “to progress this country” should not complain about being under a “sharper microscope,” but instead should just work harder to prove themselves capable. Now Sarah is a whiny presidential contender, complaining about the sharper microscope that women wanting to progress this country are under and rejecting advice to work harder to prove herself capable.

The Alaskan who shot to stardom a year ago as the tough embodiment of Diana the Huntress has now stepped down as governor and morphed into what the Republicans always caricatured Hillary as — preachy, screachy and angry.

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Palin To Hit The Radio Airwaves?

Sarah Palin in Auburn, New York.

Sarah Palin in Auburn, New York.

Inside Radio reported that Sarah Palin’s camp is exploring the syndication potential of the ex-Governor of Alaska. While it is difficult to imagine Palin succeeding across airwaves given that her speaking style–some call it incoherence–draws much criticism, a national radio show could serve as a potent platform for spreading her views and realizing her resignation-speech mission of effecting “positive change outside government.”

The article notes that it will be “an ironic twist” if Palin takes to the mic because of her negative opinion of media. But this “irony” is typical Palin operation. Indeed, the same woman who fought a public battle with Letterman and told the media to “quit makin’ things up” in her farewell speech once said in a 2008 interview that Hillary Clinton should avoid anything that could be a “perceived whine” when discussing her media coverage.

Of course, Palin does have a history of enjoying social media. Her Twitter account as governor, which shut down on Sunday, boasts 514 tweets.

But that is media she controlled. Which is why if radio becomes a reality for Palin, it seems likely that any calls she takes from listeners will be screened heavily.

Kerry Golds
The Atlantic Monthly