Tag Archives: Frank Murkowski

“Going Rogue” Review: Sarah Palin Shows She Knows How to Hate; Needs Injection of Pinocchio Serum

Outgoing Alaska Governor Sarah Palin (2nd L), her husband Todd (C) look on as incoming Governor Sean Parnell (2nd R) is sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Daniel Winfree (L) during the annual Governor's Picnic July 26, 2009 at Pioneer Park in Fairbanks, Alaska. Parnell' wife Sandy held the bible for the ceremony. Craig E. Campbell was sworn in as the new Lieutenant Governor.

Outgoing Alaska Governor Sarah Palin (2nd L), her husband Todd (C) look on as incoming Governor Sean Parnell (2nd R) is sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Daniel Winfree (L) during the annual Governor's Picnic July 26, 2009 at Pioneer Park in Fairbanks, Alaska. Parnell' wife Sandy held the bible for the ceremony. Craig E. Campbell was sworn in as the new Lieutenant Governor.

Last July in Fairbanks, with Todd smiling at her side and Piper sitting in her lap, Sarah Palin watched Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell take the oath to fill out her term in office as Governor of Alaska. Then she vanished. For the past four months the Forty-Ninth State has seen neither hide nor hair of the woman. No speeches at chambers of commerce luncheons. No sightings on the street. No Sarah cheering on the sideline at Wasilla Warriors girls basketball games. No Sarah sitting in the pew on Sunday worshiping at the ChangePoint and Anchorage Baptist Temple evangelical mega churches. She’s been gone. Disappeared.

It now turns out that while Alaskans were hunkering down for winter Sarah was in San Diego working for a woman named Lynn Vincent, the ghostwriter HarperCollins hired to cobble together Going Rogue: An American Life, Sarah’s first person account of her it-only-would-happen-in-America rise from small town mayor to small state governor to Republican Vice Presidential candidate to popular culture icon.

Since Tuesday when Going Rogue was released nationwide copies of the book have been flying off the shelves at Barnes & Noble in Boise and Grand Rapids and not flying off the shelves in San Francisco and Seattle.

Since I already have enough to read, I had intended to give Going Rogue a pass until I had time this weekend to motor over to the Anchorage Barnes & Noble and give Ms. Vincent’s word-smithing a skim. But on Monday I learned that I’m in the book. Not surprisingly, that piqued my interest. And then yesterday a friend lent me a copy.

I’ve now read it. Here’s the review.

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Sarah Palin’s Wolf Kill Program Increasing Moose For Non-Alaskan Trophy Hunters

Alaskan Wolves - Alaska is home to the largest remaining population of gray wolves in the United States. But ironically, at the same time that heroic efforts proceed to restore wolves to portions of their former habitat in the lower 48 states, wolves in Alaska continue to be intensively hunted and killed.

Alaskan Wolves - Alaska is home to the largest remaining population of gray wolves in the United States. But ironically, at the same time that heroic efforts proceed to restore wolves to portions of their former habitat in the lower 48 states, wolves in Alaska continue to be intensively hunted and killed.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An Alaska wildlife management program in which wolves are shot from low-flying airplanes and black bears are baited and snared is helping to increase the numbers of moose and caribou, state wildlife officials say.

The program has long been the target of wildlife conservation groups who view it as state-sponsored slaughter. Last fall, one of those groups launched an ad criticizing then-Gov. Sarah Palin, the Republican vice-presidential candidate, for expanding the program.

State officials contend the program is aimed at helping rural Alaskans, who rely on hunting to survive and had complained there wasn’t enough game to hunt and eat.

The program began under Palin’s predecessor, Gov. Frank Murkowski. Private citizens are permitted to shoot wolves from the air or conduct land-and-shoot hunting of wolves in six rural areas of the state.

Since the program began in 2003, over 1,000 wolves and hundreds of black bears have been killed in an effort to drive down the number of predators.

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Gov. Parnell Moves to Erase Sarah Palin, Seeks to Reopen Kensington Gold Mine near Juneau

Parnell has moved to support the reopening of the Kensington Mine near Juneau, Alaska.  The Corps of Engineers had revoked the fill permit allowing the mine to dump tailings in a land locked lake
00Kensington Gold Mine

The entrance tunnel and water treatment facility for the Kensington Gold Mine operated by Coeur Alaska can be seen against Lion Head Mountain near Juneau, Alaska. Environmental groups have demonstrated that permits allowing the proposed Kensington Gold Mine to dump tons of chemical waste into Lower Slate Lake located in the Tongass National Forest will violate the Clean Water Act.

Gov. Sean Parnell made his first move to put his stamp on the Governor’s office.

Sarah Palin’s long time friend and confidant Kris Perry, the Governor’s Anchorage office manager, stepped down.  Kris was replaced by a long time Parnell aide, Cindy Sims.

The most notable change was the resignation of Frank Bailey, Director of Boards and Commissions.  Frank attracted notoriety with his famous call to Lt. Rod Dial to discuss Trooper Wooten and confidential personnel issues that he should never have been privy to, given his position.  However, Frank was Sarah’s loyal dog, and he did what he was told.  Of that, there is no doubt.

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With Sarah Palin Resigning, Rural Alaskans Have Hope in Gov. Parnell

Of Yup’ik ancestry, Myron Naneng serves the peoples of the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta as President of the Association of Village Council Presidents (AVCP).

Of Yup’ik ancestry, Myron Naneng serves the peoples of the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta as President of the Association of Village Council Presidents (AVCP).

Known as one of Gov. Sarah Palin’s harshest critics in rural Alaska, Myron Naneng wondered if some honest-to-goodness ribbing would come his way in the aftermath of Palin’s stunning resignation announcement earlier this month.

“Many people have jokingly asked if I (should) take credit for the resignation,” said Naneng, president of the Association of Village Council Presidents. “From people on the street to other locations (around Western Alaska), I haven’t heard any desire for (Palin) to stay on.”

Palin announced July 3 she would step down as governor and hand the reigns to Lt. Gov. Sean Parnell on July 26. Palin said she did it because ethics complaints and politically-ambitious state lawmakers would keep her administration from getting any work done.

The news sent political and pop culture tremors around the globe. A few days after the announcement, Naneng talked from his Bethel office about his reaction and that of rural Alaska.

“Should I say hallelujah?” Naneng said. “What’s there to be broken up about?”

Poverty, high energy costs, and concerns about access to fish and game are the issues constantly swirling around residents in remote portions of the country’s largest state.

Naneng and AVCP recently organized a media tour of Western Alaska villages to showcase the lack of subsistence and commercial fishing in the area, days after Marshall fishermen defied authorities and illegally caught 100 king salmon.

“We didn’t call it a protest,” Naneng said. “It was fishing for food.”

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Palin Pipe Dreams

Note: On July 26, Sarah Palin resigned as Alaska governor, citing concerns that ongoing ethical investigations and her decision not to seek a second term would limit her effectiveness in office. What she did (or didn’t do) to promote the development of a $40 billion gas pipeline will be a crucial part of her short history in office. This story, which was first published on March 17, delved into the long and complicated history of a pipeline that doesn’t exist.

Sarah Palin at Lake Lucille in Wasilla, Alaska, in 2008.

Sarah Palin at Lake Lucille in Wasilla, Alaska, in 2008.

For more than 30 years, a natural-gas pipeline had been the great white whale of Alaskan resource development. Tens of millions of dollars had been spent in the quest for it. The names of collapsed consortiums and failed legislative initiatives littered the tundra like the bleached horns of long-dead caribou. Then, last summer, Sarah Palin said she had harpooned the whale.

“I fought to bring about the largest private-sector infrastructure project in North American history,” Palin said at the Republican convention. “And when that deal was struck, we began a nearly $40 billion natural-gas pipeline to help lead America to energy independence.”

During the vice-presidential debate, she said it again: “We’re building a nearly $40 billion natural-gas pipeline, which is North America’s largest and most expensive infrastructure project ever.”

And to Katie Couric, she said, “We should have started 10 years ago, but better late than never.”

To many outside of Alaska, it may therefore come as a surprise to learn that not only does such a pipeline not exist, but—even as Alaska’s deep winter darkness gives way to the first light of spring—the prospect that it will be built within Sarah Palin’s lifetime grows dimmer by the day. ( View a slideshow hitting the highlights of Governor Palin’s travels.)

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What’s Ahead For Gov. Palin? Seven Challenges

Gov. Sarah Palin, back from the campaign trail, faces a changed landscape in Alaska.

Gov. Sarah Palin, back from the campaign trail, faces a changed landscape in Alaska.

It appears that Alaska Governor Sarah Palin will probably be back on the national scene in two years campaigning as the Republican candidate in the 2012 presidential election.  We here at the Sarah Palin Truth Squad have decided to continue posting information about Governor Palin in anticipation of that race.  Today the Anchorage Daily News published the following article by Tom Kizzia on the political future of Gov. Palin.

For two months she basked — and sizzled — in the world’s hottest celebrity spotlight. Now Sarah Palin has come home to begin the last two years of her term as governor of Alaska.

Everything has changed: Palin’s personal horizon, her relations with the state’s other elected officials, the public’s sense of who she is.

Palin returned to her office Friday amid a brutal crossfire between detractors and defenders in the McCain camp. At the same time, however, a new national poll said 64 percent of Republicans consider her their top choice to run for president in 2012.

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Is Gov. Palin Setting Herself Up To Take Ted Stevens’ Senate Seat?

Well, it’s been a little over 24 hours and already the possiblity of Governor Sarah Palin jockeying for Alaska Senator Ted Stevens’ Senate seat is being seriously considered.  The Alaska Dispatch published an article today exploring Gov. Palin’s next power grab in her zealous quest for what she sees as the ultimate prize, the United States presidency.

Governor Sarah Palin just issued an updated statement on Sen. Ted Stevens’ guilty verdict, saying “the time has come for him to step aside.” But what stands out most is the next sentence in her statement. “Even if elected on Tuesday,” Palin says, “Senator Stevens should step aside to allow a special election to give Alaskans a real choice of who will serve them in Congress.”

Should Stevens emerge the winner next Tuesday and then resign, guess who might get to appoint his temporary replacement?

Governor Palin.

Alaskans are already tired of the corruption, the Palin circus, the national media, Troopergate, and the overall embarrassment their leaders have brought to the state. Stevens winning the election, resigning, and giving Palin the opportunity to appoint his replacement may just well push sourdoughs over the edge.

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