MSNBC Chris Matthews: Sarah Palin’s a “Frightening, Empty Vessel, Nothing Going on Mentally” (Video)

MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews forcefully ripped into Sarah Palin’s advice that President Obama could “declare war on Iran” to improve his re-election chances, repeatedly calling her “frightening” and claiming she’s “an empty vessel” with “nothing going on mentally.”

Palin told Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday that if Obama “played the war card” in that manner it “changes the dynamics in what we can assume is going to happen between now and three years.”

“She’s frightening. Mark, that is frightening stuff. Frightening,” Matthews said Tuesday on his show Hardball. “First of all, president don’t declare war. Anybody knows that in high school. Congress has to declare war. To declare war on Iran, I don’t think the most far right, Middle East hawk will talk about declaring war on Iran, a country with 70-some million people, with an advanced air force.

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Sarah Palin: Faux Populist

The crib notes in questions on the palm of Sarah Palin's hand.

The crib notes in questions on the palm of Sarah Palin's hand.

So, you think Sarah Palin is embarrassed by the crib-notes-on-the-palm incident?

You’re kidding, right?

This woman, like national candidates of both parties, doesn’t draw a breath without a team of political and image consultants vetting her choices. Wardrobe, hair, make-up, speaking style, text, context. This woman hasn’t moved a muscle spontaneously since she was selected as McCain’s running mate.

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Palin Reads Palm for America’s Future at Tea Party Convention (Video)

The following is an exclusive posted today on the Huffington Post:

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin addresses attendees at the National Tea Party Convention in Nashville, Saturday, Feb. 6, 2010 with talking points clearly written on the palm of her left hand.

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin addresses attendees at the National Tea Party Convention in Nashville, Saturday, Feb. 6, 2010 with talking points for what appears to be the Questions & Answer session clearly written on the palm of her left hand.

Closer inspection of a photo of Sarah Palin, during a speech in which she mocked President Obama for his use of a teleprompter, reveals several notes written on her left hand. The words “Energy”, “Tax” and “Lift American Spirits” are clearly visible. There’s also what appears to read as “Budget cuts” with the word Budget crossed out.

Closeup photo of Sarah Palin's left hand, complete with notes.

Closeup photo of Sarah Palin's left hand, complete with notes.

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Custody Battle Between Bristol Palin & Levi Johnston Brewing

Levi Johnston and Bristol Palin at the 2008 Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minnesota September 3, 2008.

Levi Johnston and Bristol Palin at the 2008 Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minnesota September 3, 2008.

The custody battle between Levi Johnston and Bristol Palin became public last week when two Superior Court judges issued orders unsealing the court record and denying the use of pseudonyms to protect the feuding parents’ identities.

A Dec. 23 order from Judge Kari C. Kristiansen denied Palin’s motion to close the proceedings and opened the case file to public access, while an order issued the same day by Presiding Judge Sharon Gleason denied Palin’s request to use John and Jane Doe in place of Johnston’s and her own real names.

On Nov. 4, Palin filed for sole custody of Tripp Johnston-Palin, the former couple’s son, who celebrates his first birthday today. Kristiansen initially issued temporary orders limiting access to the case file and allowing the parties to file under pseudonyms.

Johnston wasn’t playing along, however. In an opposition to Palin’s motion for a gag order, Johnston’s attorney, Rex Butler, said: “Simply put, this matter is public in nature, the courts are not refuges for the scions of the elite to obtain private dispensation of their legal matters because the public at large has an interest in the proceedings.”

There’s another factor in the mix, of course: Palin’s mother, former governor Sarah Palin, with whom Johnston has repeatedly locked horns in the press, and from whom he claims to fear retaliation.

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Palin, Bristol vs. Johnston, Levi (3PA-09-02261CI)

The following information is from the Alaska Trial Court Cases Public Access Docket List in the matter of 3PA-09-02261CI Palin, Bristol vs. Johnston, Levi:

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12/23/2009 Request for Oral Argument Thomas Van Flein (Attorney) on behalf of Bristol Palin (Plaintiff) Case Motion #1: Ex Parte Motions for (1) Closure of Custody Proceedings ((2) Motion for Protective Order (3) Substitution of Pseudonym’s), Case Motion #2: Ex Parte Motions for( (1) Closure of Custody Proceedings) (2) Motion for Protective Order ((3) Substitution of Pseudonym’s), Case Motion #3: Ex Parte Motions for ((1) Closure of Custody Proceedings (2) Motion for Protective Order) (3) Substitution of Pseudonym’s
12/23/2009 Reply to Opposition to Motion to Use Pseudonyms and for Protective Order (Pwk only) Thomas Van Flein (Attorney) on behalf of Bristol Palin (Plaintiff) Case Motion #3: Ex Parte Motions for ((1) Closure of Custody Proceedings (2) Motion for Protective Order) (3) Substitution of Pseudonym’s

Palin: I’m Not the Biggest Liar of the Year

Sarah Palin at a recent book signing for "Going Rogue"

Sarah Palin continues to draw negative attention to herself.

There’s an old story that occasionally makes the rounds in Washington. In the 1970s, a magazine (now long defunct) named New Times reported that Sen. William Scott, a Virginia Republican, had been ranked the “dumbest” senator in a survey conducted by a public interest group. Subsequently, Scott held a press conference to deny the charge — thereby proving he was pretty darn dumb. After all, he only called more attention to the accusation.

Sarah Palin has taken a Scott-like position.

Earlier this month, PolitiFact.com, a project of the St. Petersburg Times, awarded Palin the not-so-coveted “lie of the year” award for claiming last summer that President Obama‘s health care reform initiative would set up “death panels” run by bureaucrats who would decide if seniors and disabled citizens “based on a subjective judgment of their ‘level of productivity in society’ ” would be “worthy of health care.” PolitiFact.com explains:

On Aug. 10, PolitiFact rated Palin’s statement Pants on Fire [its highest — or lowest — rating]. In the weeks that followed, health care policy experts on both the right and the left said the euthanasia comparisons were inaccurate. Gail Wilensky, a health adviser to President George H.W. Bush, said the charge was untrue and upsetting.

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Lie of the Year: ‘Death Panels’

And the "Lie of the Year" winner is ... Sarah Palin!!

Of all the falsehoods and distortions in the political discourse this year, one stood out from the rest.

Death panels.”

The claim set political debate afire when it was made in August, raising issues from the role of government in health care to the bounds of acceptable political discussion. In a nod to the way technology has transformed politics, the statement wasn’t made in an interview or a television ad. Sarah Palin posted it on her Facebook page.

Her assertion — that the government would set up boards to determine whether seniors and the disabled were worthy of care — spread through newscasts, talk shows, blogs and town hall meetings. Opponents of health care legislation said it revealed the real goals of the Democratic proposals. Advocates for health reform said it showed the depths to which their opponents would sink. Still others scratched their heads and said, “Death panels? Really?”

The editors of PolitiFact.com, the fact-checking Web site of the St. Petersburg Times, have chosen it as our inaugural “Lie of the Year.”

PolitiFact readers overwhelmingly supported the decision. Nearly 5,000 voted in a national poll to name the biggest lie, and 61 percent chose “death panels” from a field of eight finalists. (See the complete results.)

This is the story of how two words generated intense heat in the national debate over health care.

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