Category Archives: Troopergate

Trooper Mike Wooten Breaks His Silence On Palin’s Troopergate Lies

Former Alaska Public Safety Employees Association Executive Director John Cyr and Alaska State Trooper Mike Wooten, Sarah Palin's former brother-in-law and the Trooper at the center of the Troopergate Scandal.

Former Alaska Public Safety Employees Association Executive Director John Cyr (left) and Alaska State Trooper Mike Wooten, Sarah Palin's former brother-in-law and the trooper at the center of the Alaska Govenor Palin Troopergate Scandal.

The Alaska State Trooper at the center of Sarah Palin‘s so-called “Troopergate Scandal“–which impeded her run for the vice-presidency and stained her record as Alaska governor–has broken his more than year-long silence since his embattled divorce with Palin’s sister, Molly, became a cause celebre during last year’s presidential campaign.

After reading passages from Palin’s memoirs Going Rogue that deal with his marriage and subsequent divorce, a “fed up” Mike Wooten, 37, who still serves as an Alaska State Trooper in Anchorage, called the book “a pack of lies.”

According to Wooten, Palin and her father, Chuck Heath Sr., have “interfered with my life–and my children’s lives–for at least the last five years. And it is still going on. I’m done with it.”

Characterizing his adversaries as “snakes,” Wooten said he has kept quiet long enough. “From this point on I’m speaking my mind,” he declared. “I’m speaking the truth. Let the chips fall where they may.” He acknowledged that he is considering taking legal action against Palin on multiple fronts.

Although Palin would try to claim otherwise during the presidential campaign, an independent investigation ordered by the bipartisan Alaska Legislative Council (composed of ten Republicans and four Democrats) and conducted by former Republican prosecutor Steve Branchflower, resulted in the finding that Governor Palin abused her power by violating Alaska Statute 39.52.110(a) of the Alaska Executive Branch Ethics Act.”

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McCain: Palin Legal Bill was for “Troopergate,” NOT for Vetting

Former GOP presidential candidate John McCain comments on his running mate Sarah Palin's new book "Going Rogue."

Former GOP presidential candidate Senator John McCain comments to "The Hill" on his vp running mate Sarah Palin's new book "Going Rogue."

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who spoke to The Hill Monday evening, denied Sarah Palin’s allegation that his campaign stuck her with a $50,000 legal bill to pay for the cost of vetting her as a potential vice presidential candidate.

McCain said the bill was for legal work related to allegations that Palin made improper use of her influence as Alaska’s governor to press for the dismissal of a state trooper named Mike Wooten. Wooten was embroiled in a custody dispute with Palin’s younger sister, Molly McCann.

“That was addressed by Trevor Potter,” said McCain, “That was over the Troopergate.”

In a statement to the Associated Press, Potter, McCain’s general counsel, denied that McCain’s campaign billed Palin for vetting her.

“To my knowledge, the campaign never billed Gov. Palin for any legal expenses related to her vetting and I am not aware of her ever asking the campaign to pay legal expenses that her own lawyers incurred for the vetting process,” he said.

Palin made the charge in her new book, “Going Rogue: An American Life,” which listed a litany of complaints Palin had with McCain’s campaign, such as its decision to limit her access to reporters. Palin also questioned how the campaign handled the announcement of her daughter’s out-of-wedlock pregnancy.

McCain told The Hill that he nevertheless enjoyed Palin’s book.

“I hope she sells lots of them,” he said.

Palin received a $5 million advance from HarperCollins, according to the New York Times.

Alexander Bolton
The Hill

Palin’s Wild Ride Part.1: From ‘Open and Transparent’ to Something Less

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — For Alaska politics, 2006 was a rough time. A widespread corruption investigation dominated the scene and a natural gas pipeline contract was negotiated behind closed doors — and then rejected.

Sarah Palin

Sarah Palin on a 'wild ride' through Alaska.

Against this backdrop, in walked Sarah Palin, who swept into the Governor’s Office on the pledge that government should, and would, be open and transparent.

She appeared to allow unprecedented access by the media, giving interviews almost anywhere and anytime, and the media loved every minute of it.

“I can remember our Juneau correspondent going down to Juneau for the first session where Governor Palin was in office and saying like a gigantic weight had been lifted off the building,” Channel 2 News Director Steve MacDonald said.

“When Sarah Palin campaigned on a program of openness in government, that was very appealing to me,” Gregg Erickson, founder of the Alaska Budget Report, said.

And Palin officials say they put openness and transparency to work in government.

“If you look to her greatest accomplishment, which was AGIA (the Alaska Gasline Inducement Act), you see no greater transparent or open process than that, which was removing oil and gas from behind closed doors and what ultimately we learned later was a somewhat corrupt process among many,” Palin spokesperson Meghan Stapleton said.

But some reporters covering the governor saw the transparency clouding over.

“The thing about Palin is she came on — think back, transparency and openness was the slogan of her campaign — and from the start she was anything but transparent and open,” Bob Tkacz, a fisheries reporter and publisher of Laws of the Seas, said.

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Gov. Palin Press Conference Focuses on Colberg Resignation, Federal Stimulus Money

JUNEAU, Alaska — Gov. Sarah Palin gave her first major news conference of 2009 on Wednesday, a day after Attorney General Talis Colberg’s resigned.

Palin said Colberg resigned amid a “harsh political environment.”

Palin repeated her earlier statement that Colberg chose to resign himself, and that he was not asked to write a letter to Sen. Hollis French, much like Lt. Gov. Sean Parnell did.

Palin said Colberg didn’t give a specific reason for his resignation, only saying that Colberg said it was in the best interest of the state.

“It was his choice to resign and if you want to talk to him more in detail about why he chose to resign, to leave state service, you’re free to do that,” Palin said. “I won’t speak for him.”

Palin received a letter Tuesday from Senate President Gary Stevens about what the governor called “a harsh political environment created during Troopergate.”

“I, like many Alaskans, was disappointed last fall with the way this matter became unnecessarily politicized during the national political campaign,” Stevens said in the letter. “We did not intend to smear or assault any of the witnesses; we want to put this behind us and move forward on issues of importance to all Alaskans.”

Palin said she did not want to talk about the issue further, and called it a personal issue.

She also talked about the federal stimulus package and said that the state will accept its share of funds — if those funds make sense for the state.

She specifically mentioned construction projects that need to happen.

Palin has voiced opposition to money for other programs in the past. She said the state might have to pick up the tab for some programs once it’s gone through the federal money.

Jason Lamb
KTUU – Alaska’s News Source

Half-Baked in Alaska: Palin’s 11th Hour “Troopergate” Exoneration Was a Lie

Award-winning journalist Geoffrey Dunn, writing for the Huffington Post, examines the unanswered questions left by the differening investigative findings into the Troopergate scandal of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. 

It was surely an odd bit of timing on Monday, November 3–just hours before one of the biggest presidential elections in American history–that the Alaska State Personnel Board issued a finding by its chief investigator, Timothy J. Petumenos, that Republican vice-presidential candidate and Alaska governor, Sarah Palin, did not breach state ethics laws when she fired Alaska public safety commissioner Walt Monegan in July of this year.

This last minute finding appeared to exonerate Palin of any legal culpability in the so-called “Troopergate” scandal that dogged her throughout her ill-fated, two-month run on the Republican ticket. Palin boldly claimed it a “vindication,” while headlines throughout the world declared that she had been “cleared” of any wrongdoing.

That was hardly the case. Composed entirely of political appointees–and all Republican–the Personnel Board was hell-bent on clearing Palin from the get-go. Its findings were neither final nor impartial. And they leave many questions about her behavior, along with that of her husband’s and her staff’s, unanswered.

Perhaps the most significant questions that remain are whether or not Governor Palin and her husband, Todd, committed perjury in their sworn affidavits to the personnel board.

There is significant circumstantial evidence that they did.

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Palin Sees Dip in Popularity in Alaska, Rest of Nation

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin

The Fairbanks Daily News Miner reports that Governor Sarah Palin has lost the support of Alaskan Democrats and Independents that were at one time a major part of her electoral base.  As more voters get to know Gov. Palin for her ethics violations, faux ‘Joe six-pack’ folksiness, religious fanaticism, secessionist connections and a secretive, restrictive administration governing Alaska connected to corruption, cronies, lobbyists and big oil, they are finding her to be a fraud and a hypocrite.  American voters are turned off by the McCain-Palin campaign of fear and divisiveness while Gov. Palin has been exposed as a mean spirited and vindictive politician who mixed personal financial gain and vendettas with her quest for political power.

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Is Gov. Palin Setting Herself Up To Take Ted Stevens’ Senate Seat?

Well, it’s been a little over 24 hours and already the possiblity of Governor Sarah Palin jockeying for Alaska Senator Ted Stevens’ Senate seat is being seriously considered.  The Alaska Dispatch published an article today exploring Gov. Palin’s next power grab in her zealous quest for what she sees as the ultimate prize, the United States presidency.

Governor Sarah Palin just issued an updated statement on Sen. Ted Stevens’ guilty verdict, saying “the time has come for him to step aside.” But what stands out most is the next sentence in her statement. “Even if elected on Tuesday,” Palin says, “Senator Stevens should step aside to allow a special election to give Alaskans a real choice of who will serve them in Congress.”

Should Stevens emerge the winner next Tuesday and then resign, guess who might get to appoint his temporary replacement?

Governor Palin.

Alaskans are already tired of the corruption, the Palin circus, the national media, Troopergate, and the overall embarrassment their leaders have brought to the state. Stevens winning the election, resigning, and giving Palin the opportunity to appoint his replacement may just well push sourdoughs over the edge.

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