Category Archives: Barack Obama

The Case For Palin As Time Person Of The Year?!?!

Time Person Of The Year

Time Person Of The Year

Jason Linkins, writing for the Huffington Post, examines Jon Friedman’s case for Sarah Palin as the Time magazine Person of the Year.  Is he (Friedman) kidding???  America finally elects the first African American president in the history of our country with his uplifting, inspirational campaign of hope, change and renewal, and this guy believes SARAH PALIN should be considered???

Look, people. Barack Obama is going to be Time Magazine‘s Person Of The Year. You can pretty much put that in the bank, where it will probably end up accruing as much value as anything else you’ve placed in a soon-to-be-nationalized bank over the past year. And honestly, given the fact that every President of the United States gets to be Time Magazine‘s Person Of The Year, everyone should be okay with it. Even those opposed to Obama can take heart in the fact they gave the honor to Vladimir Putin last year.

That’s not stopping a few people from mounting quixotic campaigns for others. Take this column from MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman. He thinks that the Person of the Year honorific should go to Sarah Palin. You remember her, right? Sure you do, she will not ever go away! Anyway, Friedman believes a case can be made for Timeto “go out on a limb and select Palin over the obvious pick, President-elect Barack Obama.” And it’s not because Friedman thinks Obama’s undeserving. “Obama revolutionized and electrified the political scene, becoming the first African-American to win the U.S. presidential election,” he notes. “Further, he accomplished a far-reaching goal. He made politics seem accessible and relevant to a nation of disenfranchised Americans, including generations of African-Americans.”

But Palin, according to Friedman, “achieved something remarkable in her own right,” namely, “it was possible for (truly) anyone to rise to political prominence on the national stage, whether she strikes you today as an inspiration or a punch line.”

Right! And the same thing can be said for Admiral James Stockdale!

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President Obama: Barack Obama Becomes America’s 44th President!!!!

r-celebration-huge

Actor Tim Robbins Turned Away from the Polls!! Many Provisional Ballots are NEVER Counted!! Go to Your Election Board!! Be the Squeaky Wheel!!

Here was a great comment I saw on another blog … “Provisional ballots are useless. Most never get authenticated or counted. Don’t accept a substitute today. Be the squeaky wheel until you get the vote millions died to protect!”

Checkout below the voting experience of actor Tim Robbins, whose name had been removed from the voter register in New York and was then told he would have to vote a “provisional” ballot.  Provisional ballots are rarely counted or if counted, it’s days after the election is over and the results have been announced.  This is happening ALL over the country!!  Don’t let this happen to you!!  Call the nationwide hotline for assistance and/or go to your local election board BEFORE the polls close!!

Voters who experience problems voting are advised to not leave your polling station but to call a hotline 866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683) instead to get advice. The hotline will be staffed with legal experts who can help you determine your voting rights. The Election Protection group running the hotline will also have legal experts in the field monitoring situations at the polls. If you don’t have a legal question but simply want to report a problem you had, you can call a separate hotline 866-MYVOTE1 (866-698-6831) and leave a recorded message. Be sure to leave your name and phone number on the recording if you want someone to investigate your problem.]

Tim Robbins’ Polling Place Nightmare: He’s Turned Away! (VIDEO)

Politically active actor Tim Robbins almost didn’t get to vote in New York.

TMZ reports Robbins was turned away at his polling place.

There was some kind of ruckus and the cops were called.

Apparently Robbins has been voting at that polling place for more than a decade, but today his name wasn’t on the register. They told Robbins he had to fill out a provisional ballot but he didn’t want to do it. An argument erupted between Robbins and the poll worker. Robbins allegedly got loud and the poll worker said he was calling the cops.

Robbins accused the poll worker of trying to intimidate him so he wouldn’t vote.

Robbins went downtown to the City Board of Elections to get proof he was good to vote.

That’s where a TMZ camera caught up with him. Robbins held up his papers and told the camera:

“This is what you have to do to vote… I had to go down to see a judge… My name was not on the roll, and I’m not the only one. According to workers, 30 people in 5 hours had been taking off the rolls. You can do the math on that. 6 per hour, per district across America…”

Video of Tim Robbins speaking with TMZ reporter

2008 Early Voting Statistics by States

Early Voting Statistics by States*

State Mainpage Early Voting Stats 2008 Total Early Vote Selected
Stats
2008 Early Vote / 2004 Total Vote 2004 Total Votes Cast 2004
% Early
(Ass.Press)
Last Updated
United States  
23,438,889
  19.0% 123,535,883 22.5%  
Alabama         1,890,317 3.5%  
Alaska         314,502 21.4%  
Arizona         2,038,069 40.8%  
Scottsdale City html 31,562   28.8% 109,469   10/24
Arkansas   340,964
Ballot  
Absentee 7.7%
In-Person 92.3%
31.8% 1,070,573 33.4% 10/31
California
(58 of 58 counties reporting, thnx to Joe Holland)
  3,293,617   25.8% 12,589,367 33.2% 10/24-11/1
Colorado html 1,477,836
Party  
Dem 37.7%
Rep 35.9%
No/Oth 26.4%
Ballot  
Absentee 75.3%
In-person 24.7%
68.8% 2,148,036 47.9% 10/31
(Party
stats
current through 10/30)
Connecticut         1,607,808 8.9%  
Delaware         377,407 4.9%  
District of Columbia         230,105 8.1%  
Florida^
(in-person & absentee returned)
html Election Code 9250 3,787,414
  2008 2004
Party    
Dem 45.6% 40.7%
Rep 37.8% 43.5%
No/Oth 16.6% 15.8%
Ballot    
Absentee 39.4%  
In-person 60.6%  
46.9% 7,640,319 36.1% 11/1
Georgia html
1,994,990
Race  
White 60.2%
Black 35.1%
Other/Unk 2.2%
Sex  
Men 40.4%
Women 56.2%
Unk 0.9%
Ballot  
Absentee 11.1%
In-person 88.9%
60.1% 3,317,336 20.2% 11/1
Hawaii         431,662 31.0%  
Idaho         612,786 15.9%  
Illinois         5,350,493 5.6%  
Champaign Cnty html 7,685   9.1% 84,153 4.9% 10/30
Cook Cnty html 226,090   22.1% 1,024,876   10/31
Chicago City html 260,703   24.7% 1,056,830   10/30
Indiana html 455,035   18.1% 2,512,142 10.4% 10/30
Marion Cnty   57,249 In-person only 19.3% 296,243 8.0% 10/31
Iowa   454,274
Party  
Dem 47.3%
 
Rep 28.8%
No/Oth 23.9%
29.8% 1,521,966 30.8% 10/31
Kansas         1,213,108 20.4%  
Johnson Cnty html 109,190   42.1% 259,599 37.8% 10/30
Kentucky         1,816,867 5.4%  
Louisiana html 266,880
Party  
Dem 58.5%
Rep 28.4%
No/Oth 13.1%
Race  
White 60.8%
Black 36.3%
Other 2.9%
Sex  
Men 43.5%
Women 56.5%
Ballot  
Absentee 5.1%
In-Person 94.9%
13.6% 1,956,590 6.5% 10/29
(In-person early voting period ended 10/28)
Maine html 163,981
Party  
Dem 42.9%
Rep 28.2%
No/Oth 28.9%
21.8% 751,519 21.4% 10/31
Maryland         2,395,791 5.8%  
Massachusetts         2,927,455 6.0%  
Michigan         4,875,692 17.9%  
Minnesota         2,842,912 8.2%  
Mississippi         1,152,365 6.1%  
Missouri         2,764,635 7.6%  
Montana   184,632   40.5% 456,096 21.7% 10/29
Nebraska   147,992   18.7% 792,906 13.9% 10/30
Nevada# html 500,339   60.2% 831,563 53.1% 10/30
Clark Cnty html 347,491
Party  
Dem 52.5%
Rep 30.4%
No/Oth 17.2%
63.5% 546,858 59.4% 10/30
Washoe Cnty html 90,638
Party  
Dem 47.8%
Rep 35.0%
No/Oth 17.2%
56.8% 159,511 33.0% 10/30
New Hampshire         683,672 9.0%  
New Jersey         3,638,153 5.4%  
New Mexico         775,301 50.6%  
Bernalillo Cnty html 162,452
Party  
Dem 53.4%
Rep 32.9%
No/Oth 13.7%
Ballot  
Absentee 37.6%
In-person 62.4%
61.9% 262,617   10/30
New York         7,448,266 5.1%  
North Carolina zip 2,350,712
  2008 2004
Party    
Dem 51.8% 48.6%
Rep 30.0% 37.4%
None 18.2% 14.1%
Age    
18-29 13.9%  
30-44 22.7%  
45-64 40.7%  
65+ 22.7%  
Race    
White 69.5%  
Black 26.3%  
Other 4.1%  
Sex    
Men 42.7% 42.9%
Women 56.4% 56.6%
Unk 0.2% 0.4%
Ballot    
Absentee 8.0% 13.1%
One-Stop 92.0% 86.9%
66.2% 3,552,449 30.8% 11/1 5:26am
North Dakota         316,049 17.8%  
Ohio*         5,722,443 10.7%  
Champaign Cnty html 3,666   19.2% 19,080 8.4% 10/31
Cuyahoga Cnty Pdf 228,003
Ballot  
Absentee 81.0%
In-person 19.0%
33.2% 687,255 12.4% 10/31
Franklin Cnty html 178,260   33.4% 533,575 8.8% 10/30
Gallia Cnty html 2,168   15.1% 14,391 11.1% 10/28
Greene Cnty html 5,736   7.1% 80,602 10.5% 10/28
Knox Cnty html 7,336   26.9% 27,302 13.2% 10/30
Montgomery Cnty html 50,577   17.6% 287,635 10.2% 10/30
Muskingum Cnty html 6,629   16.8% 39,565 12.6% 10/28
Ross Cnty html 8,086   25.3% 31,979 12.3% 10/30
Seneca Cnty html 4,156   15.1% 27,607 10.8% 10/30
Summit Cnty html 73,920   26.2% 281,735 10.1% 10/31
Tuscarawas Cnty html 9,339   21.3% 43,760 11.1% 10/31
Union Cnty html 3,324   14.5% 22,911 7.7% 10/28
Oklahoma         1,463,758 10.1%  
Oregon Pdf 931,310   50.3% 1,851,671 100.0% 10/30
Pennsylvania         5,769,590 5.5%  
Rhode Island         440,228 4.4%  
South Carolina         1,626,720 9.5%  
South Dakota         394,930 24.0%  
Tennessee Pdf 1,550,939   63.1% 2,456,610 47.3% 10/30
(Early voting ended 10/30)
Texas
(15 largest counties)
html 3,117,005
Ballot  
Absentee 6.4%
In-person 93.6%
42.1% 7,410,765 51.1% 10/30
Utah         942,010 7.2%  
Vermont         314,220 19.1%  
Virginia         3,223,156 7.0%  
Fairfax Cnty   78,425   17.0% 426,126 10.5% 10/30
Washington         2,883,499 68.2%  
Clark Cnty html 106,053   61.6% 172,277 62.8% 10/31
King Cnty html 316,995   35.3% 899,199 62.8% 10/31
Pierce Cnty Pdf 125,330   39.5% 317,012 80.3% 10/31
Snohomish Cnty Pdf 126,709   42.6% 297,187 65.3% 10/30
Spokane Cnty Pdf 132,172   64.8% 203,886 64.3% 10/31
Whatcom Cnty html 60,165   65.7% 91,515 72.8% 10/31
West Virginia   96,239
Party  
Dem 59.4%
Rep 31.5%
No/Oth 9.2%
Ballot  
Absentee 9.5%
In-Person 90.5%
12.5% 769,645 19.1% 10/29
Wisconsin         3,016,288 12.1%  
Wyoming         245,789 19.6%

* Link below for full spreadsheet of complete statistics

2008 Early Voting Statistics

33.6 Million Americans Watched Barack Obama’s Message to America

American Stories to US voters six days before the election of the next US president.

Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama delivered a 30-minute multi-network prime time television campaign speech entitled "Barack Obama: American Stories" to US voters six days before the election of the next President of the United States.

“The combined overall household rating for Senator Barack Obama’s Wednesday night infomercial, in the top 56 local television markets where Nielsen maintains electronic TV meters, was 21.7,” the fine folks at Nielsen tell us.

James Hibbard of the Hollywood Reporter thinks that qualifies as a blockuster: “If Barack Obama fails to win the election, perhaps the networks should hire him to entertain viewers on Wednesday nights,” he writes. “Obama’s 30-minute primetime infomercial was seen by 33.6 million viewers across seven networks – including CBS, NBC, Fox, Univision, MSNBC, BET and TV One. That’s 70% more people than watched the conclusion of the World Series last night on Fox (19.8 million).”

Taegan Goddard provides some historical context: “In contrast, the last presidential candidate to air a paid simulcast was Ross Perot in 1996, was seen by 16.8% of households. However, the ad was seen by fewer households than watched the presidential debates. The three debates were seen by 34.7%, 42% and 38.3% of households in these top markets, respectively.”

“The pundits on the cable nets may try to discount the power of the broadcast,” add Jonathan Singer at MyDD. “However, Obama was not trying to convince the Beltway cognoscenti with his event – he was trying to reach voters who might otherwise not have been reached. So the fact that what appears to have been tens of millions of people tuned in last night to a program with Oscar-like production values laying out a cogent case for why Barack Obama should be elected the next President of the United States cannot be a bad thing for the Obama campaign.”

Nielsen estimates that roughly 71% of viewers were white, 17% of viewers were black and 15% were Hispanic.*

Now the tricky question is: What do you compare Obama’s ad to? After all, such a national pre-election special hasn’t been attempted in more than a decade.

>> A Ross Perot political special in 1996 totaled 22 million viewers. And one of Perot’s ads on Nov. 2 in 1992 carried on ABC and CBS attracted 26 million viewers. Obama’s ad was 30% higher but, then again, Perot only got 19% of the vote on Election Day.

>> The lowest-rated of the three recent presidential debates received a 52.4 million viewers — but that was carried by more networks and was, after all, a highly anticipated debate instead of a paid ad.

>> Among all seven networks, the time period typically draws a total of 30.3 million — so Obama increased their viewership by about 11%.

The entertainment programming that usually runs in the slot on NBC, CBS and Fox averages 23.1 million viewers each week since the start of the season, roughly 9% lower than the Obama ad total on those networks (which is 25.5 million). 

But the usual shows are comedies and dramas. Can one realistically compare “Knight Rider” to a political ad? That would normally seem unfair — to the politician. Obama improved NBC’s time period average this season by 40% and CBS’ by 19%.

And keep in mind Obama was competing against himself.

NBC was the most-viewed and highest-rated network for its presentation of Obama’s ad, pulling 9.8 million viewers and a 3.0 preliminary adults 18-49 rating. CBS had 8.6 million (2.3) and Fox had 7.1 million (2.8). 

Among the top 56 local metered markets, Nielsen says the Baltimore market had the largest TV audience for the ad while the Portland market had the lowest.

Nielsen: 33.6 million watched Obama ad

Political Prime-Time

John McCain’s International Republican Institute Gave $448,873 to Rashid Khalidi’s Center for Palestine Research and Studies

The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood.

Rashid Khalidi, American born historian of the Middle East, Professor of Modern Arab Studies' at Columbia University's School of International & Public Affairs.

The Huffington Post published an article by Seth Colter Walls which points out the hypocrisy of the current McCain-Palin campaign attacks on Barack Obama for attending a 2003 farewell dinner honoring former University of Chicago professor Rashid Khalidi, when Senator John McCain has FINANCED projects of Professor Khalidi since the 1990’s. 

During the 1990s, while he served as chairman of the International Republican Institute (IRI), McCain distributed several grants to the Palestinian research center co-founded by Khalidi, including one worth half a million dollars.

A 1998 tax filing for the McCain-led group shows a $448,873 grant to Khalidi’s Center for Palestine Research and Studies for work in the West Bank. (See grant number 5180, “West Bank: CPRS” on page 14 of this PDF.)

The relationship extends back as far as 1993, when John McCain joined IRI as chairman in January. Foreign Affairs noted in September of that year that IRI had helped fund several extensive studies in Palestine run by Khalidi’s group, including over 30 public opinion polls and a study of “sociopolitical attitudes.”

Of course, there’s seemingly nothing objectionable with McCain’s organization helping a Palestinian group conduct research in the West Bank or Gaza. But it does suggest that McCain could have some of his own explaining to do as he tries to make hay out of Khalidi’s ties to Obama.

McCain Funded Work Of Palestinian His Campaign Hopes To Tie To Obama

McCain’s International Republican Institute IRSTax Return Shows Khalidi Grant (PDF file)

Op-Ed: TYT on Barack Obama TV Spot “He’s On Our Side”